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Your risk for having type 2 diabetes is high. Only your doctor can tell for sure if you have diabetes or prediabetes. These conditions often do not cause any symptoms; so, don’t wait to make an appointment with your doctor.

Right now, your risk for having type 2 diabetes is low. However, your risk changes over time. Be sure to schedule regular check-ups with your doctor and take healthy steps toward preventing or delaying diabetes.

An estimated 7.2 million people with diabetes are undiagnosed, and 1 in 3 American adults is at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Do you think people you care about may be among them? Help them learn their risk by sharing the Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test.

SHARE THIS TEST WITH YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY

 

Learn more about how your answers affected your result

Review Your Answers

 
 

What Should I Do Now?

 

You may feel like you don’t know where to begin. It’s important to consult your doctor before taking any next step. If you find out you have prediabetes, we recommend that you join a CDC-recognized diabetes prevention program. The lifestyle change program can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. If you’ve been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, we encourage you to find a diabetes educator that will provide the ongoing support you need to develop a plan to manage your diabetes.

I have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.
 
I have seen a doctor and have been told I have prediabetes.
 

You may feel like you don’t know where to begin. Fortunately, studies show that a diabetes prevention program can help you lose weight, reduce your risk for diabetes, and improve your overall well-being. Find a program near you today.

Managing diabetes can be a challenge and can seem overwhelming. Having a diabetes educator can make managing your diabetes easier. They work with you to develop a plan to stay healthy, and give you the tools and ongoing support you need to make that plan a regular part of your life.

 

Find a National Diabetes Prevention Program Near You

 
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Search Recognized Education Program near You

 
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SHARE THIS TEST WITH YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY

 
 

YOUR RISK FACTORS

Learn more about how your answers affected your result

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Your indicated response for this question is

 

Less than 40 years old 0 point

40-49 years old 1 point

50-59 years old 2 points

60 years or older 3 points

 

As you get older, your risk for type 2 diabetes increases. People 50 and older automatically score a point higher due to their age. You can’t stop the aging process, but you can take steps to reduce your risk through lifestyle changes and/or medication.

 
 
 
 

Your indicated response for this question is

 

Woman with No History of Gestational Diabetes 0 point

Woman with History of Gestational Diabetes 1 point

Man 1 point

 

Men are more likely than women to have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes; one reason may be that they are less likely to see their doctor regularly.

Many women who have gestational diabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes later in life.

 
 
 
 

Your indicated response for this question is

 

No Family History with Diabetes 0 point

Family History with Diabetes 1 point

 

There is a link between type 2 diabetes and family history, although the risk also relates to enviromental and lifestyle factors that family members share.

 
 
 
 

Your indicated response for this question is

 

No History of Blood Pressure 0 point

Blood Pressure History 1 point

 

High blood pressure not only raises your risk for type 2 diabetes, but also increases risk of heart attack, stroke, eye problems and kidney disease.

 
 
 
 

Your indicated response for this question is

 

Physically Inactive 1 point

Physically Active 0 point

 

Exercising regularly lowers your risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes.

 
 
 
 

Based upon your indicated response for the ethnicity/race, height and width, your current BMI is

 

Normal Body Mass Index 0 point

Above Normal Body Mass Index 1 point

High Body Mass Index 2 points

Very High Body Mass Index 3 points

 

BMI is a measure of your height vs. your weight. Having a higher BMI raises your risk for type 2 diabetes.

 
 
 

About the Risk Test

Back to Score Page

Approximately 84 million American adults have prediabetes, a condition where blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. What’s more, nearly 90 percent of those people are unaware they have the condition. With so many people at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, it’s critical for Americans to learn their risk, to be screened regularly and to take the steps necessary to delay or even prevent a diabetes or prediabetes diagnosis.

The ADA launched its first Risk Test in 1993. The test was adapted by a published study and validated using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). When developing the Test, researchers looked for specific characteristics that made a person more likely than average to have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. To make the tool as easy to use as possible, they only considered health characteristics that people would know about themselves without needing a blood test or other medical evaluation—such as age, height and weight, but not including blood glucose or cholesterol levels.

A high score on the online Risk Test (five or higher) means an individual has a significant risk for having undiagnosed prediabetes or type 2 diabetes; however, only a blood test can determine a diagnosis.

 

Learn More about Diabetes and How to Prevent it

 
 
 

Diabetes Basics

In the U.S., 1 in 3 adults has prediabetes and is at risk for type 2 diabetes, yet nearly 90% don’t know they have it. Learning about diabetes and how to prevent or delay it is the first step toward living a longer, healthier life. The ADA can help you continue down a path toward health and wellbeing.

 

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what is type 2 diabetes?

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Knowing your risk means knowing what diabetes is and how to prevent it.

Genetics and Diabetes

Genetics and Diabetes

Genetic makeup plays an important but complicated role in diabetes.

 
Stats About Diabetes

Stats About Diabetes

Know the numbers about diabetes – 1.5 million Americans are told they have diabetes each year.

Common Terms

Common Terms

There are many acronyms and medical terms used when talking about diabetes. Let us help you understand what they mean.

 
 

Steps Toward a Healthy Life

Your risk for diabetes is low and we want to help you keep it that way. It’s important to maintain a healthy weight, get regular exercise and reduce stress to delay or prevent type 2 diabetes.

 

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Active Lifestyle Guide

Active Lifestyle Guide

Our Diabetes Forecast magazine offers you a guide for inspiration, tips and gear for your healthy get-up-and-go moments.

Stress Reducing Tips

10 Stress-Reducing Tips

We all experience stress in different ways. These 10 tips from Diabetes Forecast magazine can help you improve stress management.

 
Healthy Food Choices made easy

Healthy Food Choices Made Easy

Knowing what to eat can be confusing. Learn the best and worst choices for each food group.

Get Moving For Good

Get Moving for Good!

Participate in our Tour De Cure event, which includes cycling, running, and walking options.

Eating out

Eating Out

Learn healthy tips and tricks when eating away from home.

 
 

Help Others

While you may not be at high risk for diabetes, there is likely someone in your life who is – and they need your support. Whether you are a family member, friend, or just an acquaintance, there are things you can do to help them lead healthy lives and prevent diabetes.

 

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Share the Risk Test

Share the Risk Test

Encourage others to learn their risk for type 2 diabetes and prediabetes.

Giving Support

12 Tips on How to Give Support

You want to be helpful, but you don’t want to overstep your bounds. Here are some tips to help you navigate supporting others.

 
Diabetes Friendly Workplace

Create a Diabetes-Friendly Work Place

Employers can implement common sense solutions to ensure that people with prediabetes and diabetes have the opportunity to succeed.

Project Power

Project Power

Project Power blends fun activities and wellness education to help children at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes learn valuable skills they need to live a full and healthy life.

 
 

Get Involved

Every 21 seconds, another individual is diagnosed with diabetes in the U.S. Now is your chance to help. We must take bold action to end the diabetes epidemic. Join us in our mission to prevent and cure diabetes, and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.

 

RELATED RESOURCES

Contact Us

Contact Us Directly

Our Center for Information (1-800-DIABETES) is your guide to information on diabetes, ADA programs and events, and how to get involved.

Local Offices

Find Your Local Office

The ADA has programming across the country. Reaching out to your local office is one way to get involved.

 
Become Advocates

Become an Advocate

Help find a cure for diabetes, improve access to health care, and protect the rights of people with the disease.

 
Shop Diabetes

Shop Diabetes

Purchase items that help support diabetes research, education, and advocacy.

 
 

Tips and Resources to Live a Healthy Life

 
 
 

Recently Diagnosed?

It's not easy to hear you have diabetes. But for millions of Americans, learning about their diabetes is the first step toward living a longer, healthier life. Here's what you need to get started on the path toward improved health and wellbeing.

 

RELATED RESOURCES

Checking Blood Glucose

Checking your blood glucose is one way you can know how food, activity and medicine affect your blood glucose.

Living with Type 2 Diabetes

Enroll in the free Living With Type 2 Diabetes program to get information and support.

 
 

Where Do I Begin?

Diabetes is a journey. There’s a lot to learn, but you don’t have to do it alone. The ADA is ready to help you every step of the way.

Getting Support

Your family and friends can be a great source of support because they care about you.

Your Care Team

Finding the right team of skilled health care professionals will help you manage your diabetes.

 
 

Diabetes Prevention Program

Seeing your doctor is the critical next step to determining if you have prediabetes or diabetes. If you find out you have prediabetes, we recommend you join a CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program. The program offers scientifically proven and effective lifestyle change program that can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.

 

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How effective is the program?

How effective is the program?

A CDC-recognized lifestyle change program is a proven way to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes

Is the program covered by insurance?

Is the program covered by insurance?

Costs for the program are often covered by insurance providers or employers. Check with employer or insurance providers to see if the program is a covered benefit for you.

 
 
 

Diabetes Basics

Over 30 million people have diabetes in the U.S. It’s important to know the basics about diabetes.

 

RELATED RESOURCES

what is type 2 diabetes?

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Knowing your risk means knowing what diabetes is and how to prevent it.

Stats About Diabetes

Stats About Diabetes

Know the numbers about diabetes – 1.5 million Americans are told they have diabetes each year.

Genetics and Diabetes

Genetics and Diabetes

Genetic makeup plays an important but complicated role in diabetes.

 
Common Terms

Common Terms

There are many acronyms and medical terms used when talking about diabetes. Let us help you understand what they mean.

what is prediabetes?

What is Prediabetes?

Before people develop type 2 diabetes, they almost always have "prediabetes.” Yet with exercise and a change in diet, you can delay or prevent diabetes.

 
 

Healthy Eating

Finding out that you are at high risk can be a lot to take in, and what to eat can be a big concern. The key is to know how to eat a healthy meal

 

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Making Healthy Food Choice

Making Healthy Food Choices

Learn about the most nutritious choices for each food group and find the ones that will work with your eating plan.

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What Can I Eat?

Find information on simple guidelines to help find out what eating plan works best to help you manage your blood sugar.

 
Eating out

Eating Wisely Away from Home

Healthy eating on the go can be tough. Our Diabetes Forecast magazine has great tips for eating well while dining out.

 
 

Physical Exercise

We know being active can help reduce your risk for diabetes and other health problems. But, it can be hard to get started. The ADA is here to help you get and stay active.

 

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Get Fit and Stay Fit

Get Fit and Stay Fit

Burning 100 calories can be easy with these easy exercises that take only 10-30 minutes.

Physical Activity

Tip Sheet: Physical Activity

Take this tip sheet with you as you start your plan for physical activity.

 
Staying Motivated

Staying Motivated

With busy schedules, it can be hard to stay motivated. Follow our tips for keeping up your efforts.

 
 

We encourage you to share your score with your doctor.

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or call 1-800-DIABETES (800-342-2383)

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